Ventress Memorial Library


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Ventress Memorial Library

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Tween Virtual Book Displays

November 2020 - Native American History Month

Click on a title to see its availability in our online catalog!

Fiction

  • The Porcupine Year by Louise Eldrich - In 1852, forced by the United States government to leave their beloved Island of the Golden Breasted Woodpecker, fourteen-year-old Omokayas and her Ojibwe family travel in search of a new home. *For readers who like historical fiction.*
  • I Can Make this Promise by Christine Day - When twelve-year-old Edie finds letters and photographs in her attic that change everything she thought she knew about her Native American mother's adoption, she realizes she has a lot to learn about her family's history and her own identity. *For readers who like stories about family and finding yourself.*
  • Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George - While running away from home and an unwanted marriage, a thirteen-year-old girl becomes lost on the North Slope of Alaska and is befriended by a wolf pack. *For readers who like adventure and survival stories.*
  • Weedflower by Cynthia Kadohata - After twelve-year-old Sumiko and her Japanese-American family are relocated from their flower farm in southern California to an internment camp on a Mojave Indian reservation in Arizona, she helps her family and neighbors, becomes friends with a local Indian boy, and tries to hold on to her dream of owning a flower shop. *For readers who like historical fiction.*

Nonfiction

  • Powwow by Karen Pheasant-Neganigwane - Illustrated with photographs, this is a guide to the dance, music and culture of this Indigenous celebration. *For readers who like quick and engaging books about contemporary culture.*
  • The Mayflower and the Pilgrims' New World by Nathaniel Philbrick - This young readers' adaptation tells the story of the voyage of the Mayflower and how the settlers were able to gain the friendship of many powerful Native American leaders, including the charismatic Massasoit, and how they worked together to maintain peace, the promise of the First Thanksgiving, and the violence that came after. *For readers who like American and local history.*
  • 1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving by Catherine O'Neill Grace - Countering the prevailing, traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, with its black-hatted, silver-buckled Pilgrims; blanket-clad, be-feathered Indians; cranberry sauce; pumpkin pie; and turkey, this lushly illustrated photo-essay presents a more measured, balanced, and historically accurate version of the three-day harvest celebration in 1621. *For readers who like myth-busting history.*
  • Encyclopedia of American Indian History & Culture - More than 160 tribes are featured in this fantastic new encyclopaedia, which presents a comprehensive overview of the history of North America's Native peoples. From the Apache to the Zuni, readers will learn about each tribe's history, traditions, and culture, including the impact of European expansion across the land and how tribes live today. *For reader who like trivia, maps, and learning something new!*
  • Buried Beneath Us: Discovering the Ancient Cities of the Americas by Anthony Aveni - You may think you know all of the American cities. But did you know that long before New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, or Boston ever appeared on the map--thousands of years before Europeans first colonized North America--other cities were here? They grew up, fourished, and eventually disappeared in the same places that modern cities like St. Louis and Mexico City would later appear. *For readers who like ancient history.*

Teen Virtual Book Displays

November 2020 - Native American History Month

Click on a title to see its availability in our online catalog!

Fiction

  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie - Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. *For readers who like humor and illustrations.*
  • Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac - After being taught in a boarding school run by whites that Navajo is a useless language, Ned Begay and other Navajo men are recruited by the Marines to become Code Talkers, sending messages during World War II in their native tongue. Based on real events. *For readers who like historical fiction.*
  • Hearts Unbroken by Cynthia Leitich Smith - When Louise Wolfe and Joey Kairouz are paired together for the school newspaper, they find themselves with a major story to cover: the school musical director's inclusive approach to casting The Wizard of Oz has been provoking backlash in their mostly white, middle-class Kansas town. As tensions mount at school, so does a romance between Lou and Joey -- but as she's learned, "dating while Native" can be difficult. In trying to protect her own heart, will Lou break Joey's? *For readers who like light romance and social justice.*
  • Fire Song by Adam Garnet Jones - Shane is still reeling from the suicide of his kid sister, Destiny, and he also has a secret - he's in love with his friend, David. While he and David have to hide their relationship from everyone, Shane feels that his only chance of a better life is moving to Toronto, but David refuses to join him. When yet another tragedy strikes, the two boys have to make difficult choices about their future together. *For readers who like reading about heavier topics and LGBTQ romance.*
  • Give Me Some Truth by Eric Gansworth - In 1980 life is hard on the Tuscarora Reservation in upstate New York, and most of the teenagers feel like they are going nowhere: Carson Mastick dreams of forming a rock band, and Maggi Bokoni longs to create her own conceptual artwork instead of the traditional beadwork that her family sells to tourists--but tensions are rising between the reservation and the surrounding communities, and somehow in the confusion of politics and growing up Carson and Maggi have to make a place for themselves. *For readers who like coming of age stories and retro historical fiction.*
  • The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline - In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America's indigenous population - and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow - and dreams - means death for the unwilling donors. *For readers who can't get enough dystopian fiction.*

Nonfiction

  • An Indigenous People's History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz - This Young Readers' Edition, adapted by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza goes beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World" and reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. *For readers who like American history.*
  • Fighter in Velvet Gloves by Annie Boochever - This biography traces the life of native activist, Elizabeth Peratrovich, from her birth and adoption, to the leadership role she played to expand civil rights for Alaskan natives. *For readers who like quick reads and inspiring heroines.*
  • #Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women - This slim collection presents an eclectic array of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. *For readers who like own voices narratives and artstic expression.*